Cards for Insight: Progress

In a network, finding the others.

Cards for Insight: Q&U
- Gather a small group genius around a generative question
- Pick two cards and add your thoughts between
- Engage in conversation and cultivate shared understanding
in light of intelligence augmentation and intelligence turned ability
- Take practical wisdom as a stopping rule and generative closure
- Create Q&U cardcasts, forming interactive supersets
to the more commonly known Q&A podcast formats

Q: Understanding; U: Understanding, see cards below.

Since 103% of all co-creation of value resides in the links, feedback
loops, the in-between spaces and unique insights and annotations
from participants, let’s unfold a way to address this:

Cards for Insight
1. Addressing how we relate to information and meaning-making.
2. Pick two cards and add your thoughts between.
3. Notice social stigmergy and reflect on attention.
4. Design and homestead social learning systems in light of intelligence, networked intelligence and systems intelligence.
5. Experience and learn to use Cards for Insight — As easy as a card game, as powerful as a social machine.
6. Understand how to add value in light of situational awareness.
7. Interact to the full extent of your ability.
8. Map moves conducive to knowledge mapping and flows.
9. Play with frames, frame and reframe, move beyond rigid narratives.
10. Cultivate shared understanding in light of generative closure.
11. Take thought conducive to convivial conversation.

… pick two cards and add your thoughts between …

Card: Departure Points
In a network, taking thought, making moves, finding the others, seeing ourselves through — traversing the Waste Land.

… pick two cards and add your thoughts between …

Card: Progress
Move forward or onward
in space or time.

… pick two cards and add your thoughts between …

Card: Progress
Development towards an improved
or more advanced condition.

… pick two cards and add your thoughts between …

Card: Progress

“A Klee painting named ‘Angelus Novus’ shows an angel looking as though he is about to move away from something he is fixedly contemplating. His eyes are staring, his mouth is open, his wings are spread. This is how one pictures the angel of history. His face is turned toward the past. Where we perceive a chain of events, he sees one single catastrophe which keeps piling wreckage upon wreckage and hurls it in front of his feet. The angel would like to stay, awaken the dead, and make whole what has been smashed. But a storm is blowing from Paradise; it has got caught in his wings with such violence that the angel can no longer close them. This storm irresistibly propels him into the future to which his back is turned, while the pile of debris before him grows skyward. This storm is what we call progress.”
― Walter Benjamin

John Kellden:
Create a dialogue between Frank Herbert and Doris Lessing where they explore the differences and similarities between the books Dune and Shikasta.

OpenAI:
Doris Lessing: Hi Frank, it’s so great to finally meet you.

Frank Herbert: It’s an honor to meet you too, Doris. I’m a big fan of your work.

Doris Lessing: Thank you. Now, I’m curious, what inspired you to write Dune?

Frank Herbert: Well, I was inspired by the idea of a science fiction novel that focused on ecology and the environment. I wanted to explore how humans, and particularly societies, interact with their environment.

Doris Lessing: I can certainly relate to that. My novel Shikasta also explores how our relationship with our environment affects not only us, but the planet as a whole.

Frank Herbert: That’s interesting. I think one of the differences between our two works is that Dune is set in the future, while your book is set in the distant past.

Doris Lessing: Yes, that is true. What other differences do you see in our works?

Frank Herbert: Well, Dune focuses heavily on themes of power and control, while Shikasta has a more spiritual focus.

Doris Lessing: Ah, yes, I see. I think one of the similarities between our works is the idea of balance. In both Dune and Shikasta, the protagonists are struggling to restore balance to their respective worlds.

Frank Herbert: That’s a very interesting observation. I think this is why our books have stood the test of time.

Doris Lessing: Yes, I think that is true.

https://chat.openai.com/

Cards for Insight: Q&U

Card: Question
A question is mind rediscovering
the generative nature of relating
with reality and transforming it
into possibility.

… pick two cards and add your thoughts between …

Card: Understanding
What if understanding is our
ability to hold space for the
possibility of knowledge, as
it emerges, unfolds, directs
and discloses its relevance
to unexplored aspects of
things known?

Cards for Insight: Q&U

John Kellden:
If there is a storm blowing from Paradise,
how are we to help each other progress?

… pick two cards and add your thoughts between …

OpenAI:
We can help each other progress by finding ways to work together despite the storm. This could include collaborating on strategies to reduce the effects of the storm, brainstorming solutions to the problems it causes, and supporting each other emotionally during difficult times. Additionally, we can stay informed about the storm so we can take proactive steps to protect ourselves and our communities.

Here’s the quote that inspired my prompt:

“A Klee painting named ‘Angelus Novus’ shows an angel looking as though he is about to move away from something he is fixedly contemplating. His eyes are staring, his mouth is open, his wings are spread. This is how one pictures the angel of history. His face is turned toward the past. Where we perceive a chain of events, he sees one single catastrophe which keeps piling wreckage upon wreckage and hurls it in front of his feet. The angel would like to stay, awaken the dead, and make whole what has been smashed. But a storm is blowing from Paradise; it has got caught in his wings with such violence that the angel can no longer close them. This storm irresistibly propels him into the future to which his back is turned, while the pile of debris before him grows skyward. This storm is what we call progress.”
― Walter Benjamin

Cards for Insight
— Addressing how we relate to information and meaning-making.
— As easy as a card game, as powerful as a social machine.
— Pick two cards and add your thoughts between.
— Map moves conducive to knowledge mapping and flows.
— Take thought conducive to convivial conversation.
— Cultivate shared understanding in light of generative closure.

Cards for Insight: Pilgrim’s Progress

I sat me down to gather ten thousand people
Which maybe could form a different thing
In trying to find the words which might sustain it
I found these were the thoughts I brought along

At first I took my ideas to be an anchor
And gathered up my will to guide me round
But then I clearly saw my own delusion
And found my struggles further bogged us down

In starting out I thought to go exploring
And set my foot upon a different road
Armed with knowledge to find the promised turning
But only saw how far I was from home

In searching I forsook unfolding learning
And sought instead to find some platform shine
In fighting I forgot to keep those dearest to me
And still no hidden truths could I enshrine

I sat me down to write a different story
Which maybe in the end will be a thing
The words have all been writ by one before me
We’re taking turns in trying to pass them on
Oh, we’re taking turns in trying to pass them on

… pick two cards and add your thoughts between …

Procol Harum, Pilgrim’s Progress

I sat me down to write a simple story
Which maybe in the end became a song
In trying to find the words which might begin it
I found these were the thoughts I brought along

At first I took my weight to be an anchor
And gathered up my fears to guide me round
But then I clearly saw my own delusion
And found my struggles further bogged me down

In starting out I thought to go exploring
And set my foot upon the nearest road
In vain I looked to find the promised turning
But only saw how far I was from home

In searching I forsook the paths of learning
And sought instead to find some pirate’s gold
In fighting I did hurt those dearest to me
And still no hidden truths could I unfold

I sat me down to write a simple story
Which maybe in the end became a song
The words have all been writ by one before me
We’re taking turns in trying to pass them on
Oh, we’re taking turns in trying to pass them on

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Cards catalyzing stories, Conversations that mind and matter, Digital communities & immersive productions. https://goo.gl/Ypd5u8

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John Kellden

Cards catalyzing stories, Conversations that mind and matter, Digital communities & immersive productions. https://goo.gl/Ypd5u8